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Search Results 0 to 36 of about 37 (some duplicates have been removed)
, in one of the most famous vehicles in the world. as someone who had the occasion to see pope john paul ii several times, that the electricity in the crowd is something. while the vast majority of people in the crowd are catholics, they're not all catholics. some are not even believers. one of the things we saw extraordinarily in the final days of pope john paul and for the election of this pope, was the number of people who came to st. peter's square who said i'm atheist, i'min agnostic. i'm drawn by the history. i'm drawn by the tradition that there is a person in the world when is supposed to stand for the good things, for the power of this role. so there we see him in the popemobile making what, as we heard from ann thompson, will be two rounds. i know you've seen this before, father barron. it is a unique experience. >> it is that indeed. i always think of pope from popeye. he's the father. and you're right. i think it goes beyond the catholic church. you're looking at the most important figure in the world from a symbolic standpoint. >> george, give me your thoughts as you watch the
that this pope hasn't done or even pope john paul ii that can change that perception? >> sure. i think that this pope certainly has had a papacy plagued with scandal and i think that was a clear signal to the next pope that their key task will be healing those divisions and that's going to come with more transparency and certainly transformation in our church. >> sister louise acres is a members of the sisters of charity. she was here on "jansing & co." yesterday. here's what she had to say about women in the church. >> i think the catholic church, the roman catholic church is probably one of the last bastians of sexism. i think there's a growing resistance to the status quo today and a growing movement to suggest changes. >> the sister went on to say that women in the priesthood could be one possible solution and i'm wondering what your reaction is to those comments? >> absolutely. i think it's one component of the transformation we need to see. but we can't just add women in stir, right? we need to fully transform our church, look at those policies and practices that we have that are
-to-day basis. i think we would be looking for vigorous and dynamic leadership, perhaps in the mold of john paul ii. >> archbishop of milan, the archbishop of vienna, gmt enoa, italy, two vatican cardinals in the mix, do you agree with the monsignor about the qualities of what needs to be considered as we look to who would take benedict's place? >> yes, i think the monsignor is absolutely -- as somebody who has studied this, the church has become quite diverse. while there's been a decline of things catholic in places like the united states, that is not the case in places like africa, latin, central america, central mexico. the activity has quite energized, so make a prediction that you'll see a greater voice of those communities, nigeria, brazil, mexico, because the catholic church and the conclave in particular has become more diversified over the years. don't forget john paul ii was the first known italian in 453 years, nobody ever believed that, so here we are 2013, and you might see a seismic change again. >> ray flynn, monsignor tom mcsweeny, thank you for joining me. i really appreciate i
to function. even john john paul ii. what is it about this pope that he decided to step down? >> i think there are a couple of things going on there. with john paul ii he knew he was dying. i don't think benedict is so seriously ill that he's going to die but he could -- you know, live for another 10 years. he's got an older brother. and being in the papacy and not to be up for the job. so i think he decided that it was best for the church to go at this point and let someone else carry the burden. >> bill: now as "the new york times" says, the church is at a crossroads in the sense that where the church used to be strong, it is not so much anymore and it is in a developing world in africa and in south america and in asia where the church is showing great growth. what does that say about a future pope? >> well, there's two theories here. one is you go and find somebody from africa where the church is truly growing. on the other hand, the other theory is no, you look for someone who can deal with the problems of the church, where it has real big problems, namely europe where it is in decli
to meet the pope then john paul the 2nd. then what happened happened and my mother found herself representing bill clinton to the pope. >> how exciting for her. >> it was a challenge. >> i guess it was. >> e.j. this morning quotes somebody who says the most noted earnize i earnizing -- modernizing thing this pope did was to retire, get out of the way. could it be at this modern age a pope just can't afford to be seen frail and weakened in the 24/7 news cycle? are we moving beyond the days? >> i don't think that's necessarily true. john paul felt strongly he wanted the world to see him in a sickened state because that was humanity. that he was setting an example of someone who was frail and feeble and carrying on. i think this pope, you know, has decided to set a different example. we'll see what this precedent means. does it mean future popes have to be pushed out? does he have influence after a new pope is manamed? we're in unchartered waters. >> and in quite a while, we'll see -- >> they have their own camp david. >> with the choicloisted nuns. they'll probably get better food.
-perpetuating leadership. virtually all these cardinals who are picked either by pope benedict or by pope john paul, i believe, somebody correct me if i'm wrong, the average age is somewhere in the 70s, low 70s. there aren't if to really drive your metaphor into the ground, a lot of blue state sort of cardinals in that list, and so there are not a lot of obviously progressive candidates on the list of potential popes. i don't think progressive conservative, however, is the right optic. i think the real question is when you get someone elected who actually is open to change and dialogue on some of these issues, on the all male celibate priesthood, if not on women priests. birth control is kind of a separate issue. the church ares until this contraception fight over the obama plan, really hasn't preached very much about it. it's not only the faithful who let it go. it's really the church itself who sort of accept that. there just aren't a lot of catholic families of 12 kids anymore in most of the west, and increasingly, not in the third world either. >> e.j., i want to bring in our panel here in new yor
the last pope, one that we knew growing up, pope john paul ii, literally allowed the world to watch him die. that was part of the process of sharing life, willie. >> yeah. this pope says he's old and fragile, unable to travel, but you make a good point about the previous pope. john, we've heard many times now that the next pope, whoever that may be, will have to confront the sexual abuse scandal, puts it mildly. that has consumed the roman catholic church for so long. what will that mean exactly? what will a pope do? a new pope in terms of confronting that? will he come out immediately in an opening address? will he purge some of the priests? what do you think that pope will do at least from a public relations point of view to change the perception? >> well, it's the perception and the reality. it's the most disturbing thing about any self-protecting institution. you see this as the catholic chump has, for decade upon decade now, put its own institutional survival and its own institutional dignity, really, ahead of the interests of the weakest people in its care, its children. i think many
appointed by his predecessor, john paul ii. and the two of them in terms of dock tin were right down the -- doctrine were right down the line together. the pope is going to be one of them right? we really can't expect any major changes in the direction of the church or can we? >> well, we're certainly hoping for sister simone campbell. >> bill: she's got my voice. >> unfortunately, she's not of the right gender as per vatican rules. hopefully some day that will change. >> bill: it has to be a priest. therefore has to be a man. >> correct. >> bill: if is one of these -- we've talked before about -- and i've written about some of the things the church i think has to do something about allowing priests to get married. has to do something about allowing women to be ordained, just for starters. you know, what are the chances we'll get out of this group of 115, a pope who will go in that direction? >> i think your instincts are right that there's a lot of group think going on in the conclave. a lot of folks appointed to positions of authority based on their loyalty to the institution less
the kind of italian curia that is the traditional source of popes until really pope john paul. and i think we'll end up with a similarly conservative pope. >> yeah, reverend al asked me during the commercial break what i thought. not that i would know anything about who's going to be the next pope. but one thing's for certain. given the last two popes' selection of cardinals throughout the world, they are all invariably quite conservative. so the next pope is going to, more probably than not, be similarly conservative. it's a bag job, the college of cardinals. they have rigged the deck. they have rigged the deck. >> but what you'll have, too -- >> spoken like a true catholic. >> you could have the first african pope. you could have the first latino pope. but ironically, those guys would be very conservative. you know, the growth of the church in africa is a very conservative movement. the same thing in latin america, although there's a bit of a protestant refirmation. he will be very conservative. >> everybody's talking about the possibility of an african pope. i just don't think it's goin
was standing in precisely the same place back in 2005, eight years ago when pope john paul ii died and we went into the conclave which finally produced pope benedict xvi. that took a week and several false starts. when they can't come to a consensus you have the black smoke emanating from that special chimney in st. peter's and then finally the white smoke and then you don't even know who it is until the archbishop deacon cardinals deacon comes to the window and announces a new pope and only after that the new pope comes to the within to and is greeted. but that was still at least two weeks away. at least tweaks away from that being finalized. >> is the italian media still all over the scandals that are going on involving sex and intrigue, all that stuff that we've seen in those rome newspapers over the past few days, or have they moved on? >> well, they pretty much moved on. that of course was a big story over the weekend and into monday, the beginning of this week. as you can imagine it drove the vatican mad. they were really angry, angry with the press for writing about it, angry for people
this passed the congress, the republican congress, it passed with votes from john boehner, and paul ryan said when it happened he got 98% of what he wanted. only republicans gave us the sequester, only they can stop it. >> announcer: this is the "bill press show." [ ♪ theme ♪ ] >> stephanie: whatever, jim. jim is so competitive jacki. in the parking structure he's like ha ha, i got in the building first! >> into the building first? >> really? that does it for you? >> you compete about that? >> stephanie: love letter for jacki. dear steph. huge fan and podcast subscriber. everyone involved makes the show fantastic. you guide the show along masterfully. chris is more than he's given credit for. silliness occurs when healthcare geek jacki is in the studio with us. any way to have her there with you more often? >> well, there would be if jim ward didn't constantly sexually harass her. >> there is that whole restraining order. >> i'm several feet away from her. >> that's what the restraining order says. >> stephanie: why can't we have nice things. here she is in the current news cent
of water. so is paul ryan. he's against it. house speaker john boehner actually says raising it would be unfair to workers? >> a lot of people who are being paid the minimum wage are being paid that because they come to the workforce with no skills. and this makes it harder for them to acquire the skills they need in order to climb that ladder successfully. >> how convoluted is that? the message from john boehner, if you're a low-skilled worker, hey, stay poor. democrats are ready to pounce all over this. white house senior adviser dan pfeiffer asked republicans for an actual plan to ensure full-time workers will not live in poverty. the president plans to press the issue hard as he takes it -- makes it a big part of his policy agenda on the road. republicans, they are all over the place in response. for instance, take congresswoman marcia blackburn of tennessee. she said a low minimum wage was good for her when she got her first job. >> i remember my first job. when i was working in a retail store, growing up down there in laurel, mississippi, i was making like $2.15 an hour. and i w
vote on john brennan as cia director is going to be held in the last week of february. dianne feinstein says they are awaiting more drone memos from the white house. ran paul is leading the charge on this. he says i'm going to object in any way we can until we find out whether or not the head of the cia claims the authority to kill americans without a trial with a drone in america. >> which is an amazing thing for a conservative republican senator to be saying. to making an unimaginably soft on military power left wing argument against john brennan and drones. you wonder what his fellow members of the republican caucus are saying about or to rand paul. dude, you know, we like drones. we like killing people. >> i don't think rand paul does too much working with the caucus sounds like. i think that's the issue. >> you know, maggie, a lot of people think it's premature for us to be talking about 2016. rand paul is going to be a serious issue for the republican party not just because he is giving a post-buttle -- post-buttle to the rebuttal -- so many buttales -- but because he is very cons
into another recession. if you ask republican senator rand paul, this crisis, it's a pittance. it's just really nibbling at the edges. no big deal. republican house speaker john boehner says this crisis threatens national security. republican congressman tom cole says fiscal questions trump defense. i can totally see how they are going to win the message war on this thing, right? they just have to pick one of their seven messages on it before deciding to award the points here. how this particular crisis is fought over to some people i'm sure is politically fascinating. to most of the country, though, it is unfascinating. it is not fascinating at all. it seems like the inarguably important and interesting thing here is that we keep doing this. this is how we govern now. between president obama and the republican-led house of representatives, this is how the united states government works now. we're not lurching from crisis to crisis because crises keep arising naturally in the world and we have to respond to them, we're lurching from crisis to crisis to crisis to crisis because we keep creating
it reminded me of was the clint eastwood ad for chrysler. and the advantage they have is paul harvey is not going to come back with a chair at a republican convention. but i thought it was a beautiful ad. you almost expected to hear john cougar mellencamp's old songs that we used to sing at farm aid concerts is what i was thinking as i was watching. >> was there a political message there at all, do you think, karen? >> i do, actually. as it was playing, sort of thinking there is a slice of america that we're losing. i mean, you talked than, frankly, just before this segment. and there are very real reasons why family farmers and small farmers are struggling in this country. and, you know, there were beautiful images and things we should be very proud of in terms of the american ethic of hard work and all of that. and yet we're not taking care of those values and not cherishing those values and doing the things we can to preserve that in the ways that i think we could be. >> jonathan, what about the ad? the mayors against illegal guns took out. effective? your thoughts. >> yeah, i thi
this spector of the secretary of defense nominee being held up for personal reasons, as john mccain just said. you've got brennan being held up by rand paul. he says he's going to place a hold on brennan at the cia. jack lew is undergoing questioning now and getting roughed up a bit. and right now his nomination may or may not be held up. what's the republican end game here? it's just not good for the national party brand. >> no, i don't think it is good, joe. and you've seen all this up close before. i think this is just a moment of leverage here. i mean, look. the president's got leverage on his domestic agenda right now. he's used his leverage after the election on taxes. you know, this is some leverage that republicans have to get some questions answered, to send some messages, to fire some shots across the bow. they're doing that. the white house is listening, by the way. it's mostly vice president biden who's talking to some of these more recalcitrant republicans and making sure they get what they need so they can get some of this stuff behind them. issues like benghazi. you know, i don
through a republican primary. maybe they carve up the reasonable vote and rand paul walks through without looking. >> we know that jeb bush won the election in 2008. >> john mccain -- >> he also won, he took a hard line against immigration but was seen as a liberal republican earlier in his year. >> earlier in his career. >> at different points in his career. we tend to believe that moderate republicans can not get through the process but they have shown that it ends up happening. >> do they not get through the process, at the expense of, and look at the last republican primary as the example, by the time mitt romney picked up the nomination after the 112 republican debates that we were judged to. >> and somewhere to the right of herman cain >> i want do not think it's fair to paint taall the republicans with the mitt romney brush. >> the point that was being made is that even if you are not as. right leaning, as some would have you -- some folks may have you to -- some may try to paint you to be. by the time the primary is over, you have really come across -- >> it's true for both partie
Search Results 0 to 36 of about 37 (some duplicates have been removed)